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10 Plants Poisonous To Dogs That Could Be In Your Yard

As the weather gets warmer, we’ve naturally been spending more time outside—and that means Topher gets more outdoor time too! While it’s rare that Topher gets to be out in our backyard by himself, sometimes it happens. And sometimes, I come out to find Topher munching on some grass or the stray leaf off a bush. While it seems harmless, sometimes walking out to find your dog munching on some leaves can be a serious concern. More than 700 plants have been identified as producing toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. How many are lurking in your own yard?

When leaving your dog unsupervised in your backyard, it’s easier to create a safe space all their own than it is to dog-proof the entirety of your yard. If your dog is an outdoor dog, they should have a fenced area where there is accessible food, water, and shelter; additionally, make sure any plants they have access to are non-toxic.

Here are ten common outdoor plants poisonous to dogs, that might be growing in your backyard right now.

Misoprostol order Azaleas — Probably the most ubiquitous southern garden plant. Not only are azaleas toxic to cats and dogs, this plant is also dangerous to horses, goats, and sheep. The ingestion of just a few leaves can cause serious problems. Symptoms include digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate. Ingestion of this plant can also lead to coma and death.

10 Plants Poisonous To Dogs That Could Be In Your Yard

learn the facts here now Begonias — Begonias are a popular garden and container plant that is toxic to both dogs and cats, with its tubers being the most toxic portion. Ingestion can cause oral irritation, intense burning of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.

Boxwood — Keep your dog out of those hedges, all parts of the boxwood plant are equally toxic to dogs. Boxwood plants can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and intense gas.

Daffodil — Like the tulip, this harbinger of spring is very dangerous to dogs, specifically the bulbs, which have the highest concentration of toxins. Symptoms can include intense gastrointestinal irritation, drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions, and cardiac abnormalities.

English Ivy — As if I needed more of a reason to get rid of all the tree-killing English Ivy in our yard! The ingestion of English Ivy in dogs can cause diarrhea, gas, and vomiting.

Hydrangea — Another popular southern plant, hydrangeas are toxic to dogs, cats, and horses. Symptoms can include vomiting, depression, diarrhea, and in rare cases it can cause cyanide intoxication.

Milkweed — While milkweed is the perfect plant for encouraging Monarch butterflies, it’s quite toxic to dogs and cats alike. Symptoms include vomiting, weakness, anorexia, and diarrhea are common; may be followed by seizures, difficulty breathing, rapid, weak pulse, dilated pupils, kidney or liver failure, coma, respiratory paralysis and even death.

Rhododendron — Similar to the azalea, the rhododendron is a seriously dangerous plant for your dog to ingest. The ingestion of just a few leaves can cause serious problems. Symptoms include digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate. Ingestion of this plant can also lead to coma and death.

Wisteria — I love the look of wisteria, but it too is a dangerous plant to have in the yard! The seeds and pods of wisteria can be extremely dangerous to your pooch, as they can be to people: they contain lectin, found in most types of beans. Symptoms can include vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea, and depression.

Yew — Ingestion of any part of the yew tree (with the exception of the flesh of the berries) can be very dangerous to animals. Horses have an especially low tolerance to yew. Central nervous system effects such as trembling, incoordination, and difficulty breathing can occur. It can also cause significant gastrointestinal irritation and cardiac failure, which can result in death.

This list isn’t comprehensive, no list is, but it covers the most common plants your dog might find indoors. Find a full list of toxic plants on the ASPCA’s website.

Many poisonous plants don’t kill, they just make your dog sick, so if your dog is experiencing serious symptoms, it’s likely that they’ve ingested a substantial amount. The ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (888 426-4435) or the Pet Poison Helpline (800 213-6680) can help you figure out what next steps should be taken.

For Animal Poison Control (or your vet) to help, they have to know what plant, exactly, your dog ate. A tall plant with green and yellow leaves isn’t a good answer. If you have pets, know everything that you’re planting by both common and botanical names, which usually come on a tag with the plant. Keep that info where you can find it if your dog ends up eating things he shouldn’t have been.

Lucy Bennett

Lucy is a writer, artist, and Hufflepuff currently living in Atlanta, Ga. When not making things, she enjoys costuming, tabletop games, and digging in the dirt.

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